Pinch My Salt http://pinchmysalt.com Food, Recipes, and Photography Wed, 14 Dec 2016 20:53:57 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.7.5 1230736 How to Blind Bake a Pie Crust and Prevent Shrinking and Slumping http://pinchmysalt.com/how-to-blind-bake-a-pie-crust-and-prevent-shrinking-and-slumping/ http://pinchmysalt.com/how-to-blind-bake-a-pie-crust-and-prevent-shrinking-and-slumping/#comments Sun, 20 Nov 2016 23:18:37 +0000 http://pinchmysalt.com/?p=10707

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How to Blind Bake a Pie Crust and Prevent Slumping | pinchmysalt.com

This method of rolling out pie dough, fitting it to the pie plate, crimping the edges, and blind baking the crust is one you can use with any pie dough recipe and for any pie recipe that requires a pre-baked or blind-baked pie crust.

This is a continuation of my sourdough pie crust tutorial, so the pie dough in the photos below is an all-butter pastry dough made with the addition of sourdough starter. But it behaves pretty much like any all-butter pie dough.

I have tried many different methods of blind baking pie crusts over the years and I’ve never run across one that is foolproof. I’ve dealt with so many slumped, shrunken, misshapen pie crusts!

But this year is different. Thanks to this amazing post by Stella Parks at Serious Eats, I feel like I finally have a go-to method that I can rely on.

So let’s get started.

First of all, when blind baking a pie crust, you want to start with the right pie plate. The best pie plate for a single crust pie is one with a flat lip around the outside. That lip is important in helping to build up a crust edge that keeps the pie crust from slumping or becoming misshapen.

Glass and metal pie plates will give you the best results when blind baking a pie crust because they conduct heat better than ceramic. I like to use these basic 9-inch Pyrex pie plates.

You want to start with pie dough that is well chilled, because it is important to keep the butter from softening too much while rolling it out. The problem is that cold butter is very firm so it’s really not that easy to roll out.

But follow along and I’ll show you a little trick to help you get rolling.

To get started, you want to make sure you flour your rolling surface and have extra flour nearby because you’ll be adding extra flour as you go.

Rolling out pie dough | pinchmysalt.com

I like to keep flour in a little shaker canister because it’s easy to add just a bit of flour when I need it. But keeping a bowl full of flour nearby to sprinkle with your fingers works well, too.

Rolling out pie dough | pinchmysalt.com

Make sure to flour the top of the dough as well.

Rolling out pie dough | pinchmysalt.com

Now here’s the little trick. To soften the dough quickly, without letting it warm up, I like to pound it a bit with my rolling pin. I can’t remember where I saw this, but I have a feeling that it came from Julia Child. It seems like something she would do! Anyway, it works great.

Rolling out pie dough | pinchmysalt.com

As you whack it a few times, you’ll see it expand a bit in one direction. Next, turn it 90 degrees, and hit it a few more times. The dough will then be a bit more pliable and easier to roll. And by turning the dough as you hit it, it should keep a somewhat circular shape.

Now, check to see if it’s sticking underneath and add some more flour on the top and bottom before you start rolling.

Rolling out pie dough | pinchmysalt.com

I like to start rolling from the center and up, and then roll back down to the bottom. Then I give the dough a quarter turn and repeat. As you’re rolling and turning, check for sticking and just sprinkle a bit more flour as you go. It’s also useful to flip the dough over a few times.

I’m going to share a video at the bottom of this post demonstrating how to roll out pie dough, because it’s not easy to show in pictures.

Rolling out pie dough | pinchmysalt.com

Depending on your pie crust recipe and how dry your dough is, you may end up with some cracking. I usually do, because I tend to err on the side of a dryer dough. If this happens, just kind of pinch the cracks together with your fingertips and continue on.

Rolling out pie dough | pinchmysalt.com

I try to roll my dough out to between a 13- and 14-inch diameter. This gives me enough overhang to account for cracks or a not-quite-round circle. And yes, I do measure.

I actually keep a small tape measure or roll of measuring tape in a kitchen drawer with my baking stuff, because I’m not very good at estimating measurements.

Rolling out pie dough | pinchmysalt.com

To move the dough to the pie plate, I think it’s easiest to carefully fold it in half before lifting it, then lay it over half the pie plate and carefully unfold it. Some people wrap it around the rolling pin and then unroll it over the plate, but the folding method works best for me.

Once you get the dough into the pie plate, try not to stretch it. Just gently ease it in, as centered as you can.

Rolling out pie dough | pinchmysalt.com

In order to have an even crimped edge, it’s good to start with an even overhang, which will be folded under to create the crimped edge. It’s easiest to use scissors to trim the dough, and I like to trim it to about an inch all around. Yes, I measured it again. It doesn’t have to be perfect, but just try to keep it fairly even.

Rolling out pie dough | pinchmysalt.com

Next, fold that overhang underneath so that the edge of the folded dough is about even with the edge of the pie plate. That pie crust edge will hang on to the pie plate while it is baking and help prevent it from slumping down. This is why a plain pie plate with a lip around the outside works best for single crust pies.

Saving the pie dough scraps | pinchmysalt.com

You can wrap your extra dough scraps in the leftover plastic wrap and pop them in the fridge in case you want to turn them into pie decorations or make little pie crust cookies.

Fluted Pie Crust | pinchmysalt.com

Next, you can make a decorative edge by crimping the dough with your fingers or using the tines of a fork to press it down against the pie plate edge. Again, I’ll share a video down below to demonstrate how to make a fluted edge.

Crimping the pie crust edge with your fingers or a fork not only makes your pie look nice, but it also helps to keep the crust in place while baking.

Once your crust is formed, you’ll need to chill it again before baking it. In my experience, the minimum is one hour, but the Serious Eats article on blind baking a pie crust suggests a minimum of two hours. This last time, I split the difference and chilled it for an hour and a half, because that’s what my schedule allowed.

How to blind bake a pie crust | pinchmysalt.com

Now here are some more of the tricks I learned from the Serious Eats article.

Instead of standard pie weights, beans, or rice, you can use sugar to weigh down the crust while baking it. The sugar is heavy and spreads to evenly fill the pie plate. Line the crust with foil, then fill it to the brim!

When you’re done with it, the sugar can be stored and used as normal. It will eventually turn a light brown if you bake it more than once, but the flavor of the lightly toasted sugar is wonderful and would enhance pretty much any dessert.

The second trick is to bake the crust at 350 degrees for a full hour, with the foil and sugar (or pie weights) in place the entire time. I have to admit I was a little skeptical of this idea, but it worked so well!

The foil protected the crust from over-browning, the crust didn’t shrink or slump or puff up. This is by far the best result I’ve ever had blind baking a pie crust!

Blind baked pie crust | pinchmysalt.com

To read more about the details of this method, read the full post on Serious Eats. It’s full of great information!

Family Favorite Lemon Cream Pie Recipe | pinchmysalt.com

Even though I baked this lemon cream pie for an additional 20 minutes at 325 degrees, you can see that the pre-baked crust did not brown too much. This will definitely be my method of choice for blind baking pie crusts in the future.

Now here are those videos I promised!

This one from Real Simple shows you how to roll out a pie crust. If you can’t see the embedded video below, you can watch it here on YouTube.

And here’s a video from Fine Cooking that shows you one way to crimp the edges of your pie crust. If you can’t see the embedded video below, you can watch it here on YouTube.

Related Recipes:

Pie Crust Recipes Around the Web:

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Easy Lemon Cream Pie http://pinchmysalt.com/easy-lemon-cream-pie-recipe/ http://pinchmysalt.com/easy-lemon-cream-pie-recipe/#comments Sat, 19 Nov 2016 16:44:58 +0000 http://pinchmysalt.com/?p=10681

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Family Favorite Lemon Cream Pie Recipe | pinchmysalt.com

If you like key lime pie, you are going to love this easy, sweet, and tart lemon cream pie recipe! With only three ingredients, the filling can be whipped up in minutes. And because this pie is baked, the filling has a wonderful smooth consistency that holds its shape when you slice it.

My daughter turned 6 months old the other day and I am in shock at how fast time has passed since she was born. I’ve heard parents says this over and over and over, but of course I had no real understanding of what it meant.

So far parenthood has been a constant struggle to stay present and appreciate each day, each moment, each second while secretly and openly yearning for the changes to come. (First smile, first giggle, first full night of sleep, first word, first step—so many firsts to anticipate!)

But it’s all accompanied by an intense mourning as each stage passes.

It’s the ever-present feeling of loss that I wasn’t prepared for. Each tiny outgrown piece of clothing is marked by at least a few tears as it is carefully folded and set aside.

I’ve jokingly referred to the laundry basket in the closet where I temporarily store her outgrown clothes before sorting and packing them away as the basket of sorrow. I laugh about it—you have to, but at times it has been gut-wrenching.

Luckily, all those feelings are balanced by joy. So much joy! Indescribable joy. And more tears, but happy tears. (Seriously, I was not prepared for the amount of crying that would happen this first year.)

Family Favorite Lemon Cream Pie Recipe | pinchmysalt.com

What I’m currently experiencing is the loss of this lemon cream pie that was polished off by my husband last night, because it also brought joy. I made it for Phil’s birthday, so it was his right to eat the last piece, but it still hurt.

Luckily, I have a tree full of lemons that are just starting to ripen, so I can make another for my birthday. And Thanksgiving. And Christmas.

This easy lemon cream pie has become a family favorite since I started making it a few years ago. The filling consists of only three ingredients, which can be whisked together by hand. It bakes up in about 20 minutes, and it seriously comes out perfect every single time.

Family Favorite Lemon Cream Pie Recipe | pinchmysalt.com

The easiest version of this pie would involve a store-bought graham cracker crust and pre-made whipped topping. Making it that way would be delicious and if you’re really pressed for time, that’s the way to go.

I prefer a regular pie crust over graham cracker crust, because the pie filling is intensely sweet thanks to the sweetened condensed milk. The pastry crust helps to cut the sweetness just a bit. But if you like a graham cracker crust with key lime pie, you’ll like it with this pie as well.

If you use a store-bought frozen pie crust, you’ll need to prebake it following the directions on the package before adding the filling and baking it again. Still, it’s pretty easy. And you could still use whipped topping from a tub or can if you’re pressed for time.

Of course my version is the most time consuming (and most delicious) of all. I like to start with a homemade, butter-rich pie crust and top it with fresh whipped cream, piped into decorative swirls. This latest pie was made with my sourdough pie crust, but you can use whichever pie crust recipe you like best.

Sometimes I make a regular all-butter pie crust and sometimes I make one that uses a combination of butter and shortening. If you like the type of pie crust that you find at Marie Callender’s, you’ll want to use a pie crust recipe that is made with just vegetable shortening.

My husband prefers the sourdough pie crust with this lemon cream pie because of the amazing flavor, but if you are looking specifically for a tender, flaky crust, you might be disappointed. The sourdough crust is delicious, and it does have some buttery flakes, but it is a very sturdy crust, and can’t really be described as tender and light.

I like to use a homemade stabilized whipped cream topping, which is just sweetened heavy cream with a bit of gelatin added. The stabilized whipped cream will hold it’s shape and won’t weep, even if the pie is decorated the day before you eat it.

We’ve found that this pie will keep perfectly well for up to a week, if it’s stored in a covered container in the refrigerator.

If you don’t need to make the pie in advance, stabilizing the whipped cream isn’t really necessary. I have included instructions for both stabilized and regular homemade whipped cream in the printable recipe at the bottom of this page.

You can use a piping bag and open star decorating tip to create whipped cream swirls or you can just spread whipped cream over the entire pie. I usually opt for swirls, sometimes covering the pie completely, sometimes leaving the center uncovered.

Okay, as you can see, there are many options for this pie. The filling is so delicious that the pie will be a hit no matter how much effort you put into the crust and topping. So just do what works best for you and your schedule.

Squeezing fresh lemon juice for Lemon Cream Pie | pinchmysalt.com

I used Meyer lemons off my tree for the juice, but regular lemon juice is perfect. Fresh-squeezed will be better than bottled lemon juice.

Egg yolks for lemon cream pie | pinchmysalt.com

You’ll need three large egg yolks. These were provided by my chickens, which is why they’re so orange!

Whisking egg yolks for lemon cream pie | pinchmysalt.com

You can whisk the yolks by hand or with a hand mixer. I just use a whisk.

Whisking egg yolks for lemon cream pie | pinchmysalt.com

Just whisk them for a few minutes until they’ve increased in volume just a bit and lightened in color.

Lemon Cream Pie ingredients | pinchmysalt.com

These are the only ingredients you need for the filling: lemon juice, egg yolks, and a can of sweetened condensed milk.

Making filling for Lemon Cream Pie | pinchmysalt.com

Once you’ve whisked your yolks, whisk in the lemon juice and sweetened condensed milk until everything is well combined.

Lemon Cream Pie ready for the oven | pinchmysalt.com

Pour the filling into your pre-baked pie crust (or prepared graham cracker crust, if that’s what you’re using).

Baked Lemon Cream Pie | pinchmysalt.com

Bake the pie for about 20 minutes at 325 degrees, or until the filling no longer jiggles in the center when you shake it. It might take longer if your pie crust is smaller than 9 inches in diameter, because the filling will be a bit thicker.

Let the pie cool at room temperature then refrigerate it for a few hours before adding the topping.

Family Favorite Lemon Cream Pie Recipe | pinchmysalt.com

Enjoy!

Yields 8 servings

Lemon Cream Pie
Save Recipe

Ingredients

3 large egg yolks

14-oz can sweetened condensed milk

1/2 cup lemon juice

8- or 9-inch baked pie crust or prepared graham cracker crust

Topping:

1 teaspoon unflavored gelatin (optional, for stabilized whipped cream)*

4 teaspoons cold water

1 cup heavy whipping cream

1/4 cup powdered sugar, sifted

1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract

Instructions

1. Preheat oven to 325 degrees F.

2. In a mixing bowl, whisk egg yolks until color lightens a bit. Add condensed milk and lemon juice and stir until smooth.

3. Pour filling into cooled pie crust (or graham cracker crust). Bake at 325 degrees for 20 minutes, or until filling is set (it won't jiggle when you shake the pie plate). My 9-inch pies are always done at 20 minutes, but If you are using an 8-inch pie crust, the filling might take a bit longer to bake.

4. Let pie cool completely on wire rack then refrigerate for a few hours before adding the whipped cream topping.

Regular Whipped Cream Topping:

1. Whip the cold heavy cream with whisk attachment on mixer or by hand with a whisk until soft peaks form. Add powdered sugar and vanilla then continue mixing until medium-stiff peaks form.

3. Spread whipped cream over the top of the pie or use a piping bag and large open star tip to create decorative swirls.

Stabilized Whipped cream topping:

1. In a very small microwave-safe bowl, sprinkle gelatin over 4 teaspoons of cold water. Let bloom for 5 minutes then microwave in 5 second bursts until gelatin is fully dissolved. Set aside to cool a bit.

2. Whip the cold heavy cream with whisk attachment on mixer or by hand with a whisk until soft peaks form. Add powdered sugar, vanilla, and gelatin mixture and continue mixing until medium-stiff peaks form.

3. Use a piping bag and large open star tip to create decorative swirls over the top of the pie.

Notes

*If you would like to decorate the pie a day ahead of time and want to make sure that the whipped cream topping holds its shape and doesn't weep, follow the directions for the stabilized whipped cream topping. The flavor is not affected, but the whipped cream will be slightly firmer and will hold its shape really well.

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This lemon cream pie recipe is based on the Eagle Brand Lemon Cream Pie found on All Recipes.

I will be sharing photos and instructions for rolling and blind baking the sourdough pie crust tomorrow. I had planned on combining that with this post, but realized it was going to be too long and contain too many photos!

This post may include Amazon affiliate links. Making purchases through these links won’t affect the amount you pay, but I will earn a small percentage, which helps support this blog and my family. If I write about products I have received for free or am ever paid to write about a product, it will always be disclosed. Thank you.

Kitchen equipment used for this recipe:
(the following are Amazon Affiliate links)

Related Recipes:

Around the Web:

Family Favorite Lemon Cream Pie Recipe | pinchmysalt.com
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Wordless Wednesday: First Halloween http://pinchmysalt.com/wordless-wednesday-first-halloween/ http://pinchmysalt.com/wordless-wednesday-first-halloween/#comments Wed, 16 Nov 2016 14:41:45 +0000 http://pinchmysalt.com/?p=10563 little-bee-3

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How to Make a Sourdough Pie Crust http://pinchmysalt.com/how-to-make-sourdough-pie-crust/ http://pinchmysalt.com/how-to-make-sourdough-pie-crust/#comments Mon, 14 Nov 2016 00:09:56 +0000 http://pinchmysalt.com/?p=10604

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Sourdough Pie Crust | pinchmysalt.com

This flaky all butter sourdough pie crust will take your Thanksgiving and Christmas pies to the next level. If you prefer savory pies and tarts, this recipe makes an amazing sourdough quiche crust or base for any savory tart.

My sourdough pie crust recipe is based on a traditional all-butter pastry or pâte brisée. I have substituted sourdough starter for part of the flour and all of the liquid.

For this recipe to work, it is important that you are using sourdough starter that is kept at 100% hydration. This means that your starter is fed with equal parts flour and water, by weight.

If you have been feeding your starter with a ratio of one cup of flour and 1/2 cup of water, then you are basically keeping it at 100% hydration because one cup of flour and 1/2 cup of water weigh close to the same amount. It will be close enough that it should work fine in this recipe.

If you have a starter that you routinely feed with a different ratio of flour to water, you can bring it to 100% hydration by feeding it a few times with equal parts flour and water, by weight.

For example, a cup of sourdough starter weighs about 9 ounces. If you use a cup of starter for pancakes or biscuits then you would feed your starter with 4 1/2 ounces (127 g) of flour and 4 1/2 ounces (127 g) of water. Do this a couple more times and your starter will be pretty close to 100% hydration and ready to go.

If you need me to clarify any of this, please leave a comment! If you don’t yet have a sourdough starter, learn how to make one here.

If you don’t own a kitchen scale and you are new to playing with sourdough, I would definitely invest in one soon. It will make your life so much easier and open you up to lots of wonderful bread recipes that rely on weight rather than volume measurements.

My favorite everyday digital scale is this one by Escali. (You’ll see it in the photos below.) I bought mine when I was living in Sicily and I have used it almost daily for 10 years without having to replace it!

I also love this bigger scale by OXO. The display pulls out so you can see it even if you are weighing something in a big bowl, which is really nice! Although I use both, I definitely keep my little red Escali scale on the counter and reach for it most often.

Okay, now that you know your starter is at the proper hydration for this recipe, you’ll also want to make sure that it has been fed recently and then chilled in the refrigerator. As long as you have fed it within a week, the flavor will be perfect for this sourdough pie crust.

If it has been longer than a week between feedings, feed it the day before or a few days before you want to make the pie dough and keep it in the refrigerator overnight to ensure that the starter is well chilled.

The longer the starter goes between feedings, the stronger the flavor gets. In the sourdough biscuits or pancakes, it’s fine to use sourdough starter that has been hanging out in the fridge for longer than a week. But in this pie crust recipe, you really don’t want the flavor to be too strong, especially when using it for sweet pies.

And one last thing. I make this pie dough in a food processor so that’s how I’m going to teach you to do it.

Yes, it can be made by hand and I have done it that way, but it is faster and easier in the food processor. This is the method I have settled on after making this pie crust several times over the last few years.

If you don’t have a food processor, you can use a pastry blender to work the butter and sourdough starter into the flour.

Okay, now we’re ready to make sourdough pie crust!

Butter for Sourdough Pie Crust | pinchmysalt.com

First, slice up your butter. Once it’s sliced, put it back into the refrigerator or stick it in the freezer for a few minutes. You want the butter to stay very cold!

Sourdough Starter for Sourdough Pie Crust | pinchmysalt.com

Measure out 8 ounces (227 g) of your sourdough starter. If you don’t have a digital scale yet, measure out a scant cup of sourdough starter.

Flour for Sourdough Pie Crust | pinchmysalt.com

Next, measure out 1 1/2 cups of all purpose flour. If measuring by weight this is 187 grams or 6.6 ounces.

Flour, Salt, and Sugar for Sourdough Pie Crust | pinchmysalt.com

To the flour, add a tablespoon of sugar and a teaspoon of table salt.

Flour, Salt, and Sugar in Cuisinart | pinchmysalt.com

Put all the dry ingredients in the food processor.

Flour, Salt, and Sugar in Cuisinart for Sourdough Pie Crust | pinchmysalt.com

Pulse to combine the flour, sugar, and salt.

Flour, Salt, Sugar, Butter in Cuisinart for Sourdough Pie Crust | pinchmysalt.com

Distribute the cold butter evenly over the top of the flour.

Making Sourdough Pie Crust in Cuisinart | pinchmysalt.com

Pulse until the butter breaks up into small chunks. The smaller pieces should be around the size of peas with some larger pieces mixed in.

You don’t want to chop the butter up too much because it will continue to get worked in during the next step.

Making Sourdough Pie Crust in Cuisinart | pinchmysalt.com

Spread the sourdough starter over the top of the flour/butter mixture.

Making Sourdough Pie Crust in Cuisinart | pinchmysalt.com

Pulse until the mixture just starts to clump together a bit. You should still be able to see the butter pieces, although they will be smaller.

The dough should feel like it will come together if you pinch it with your fingers.

Making Sourdough Pie Crust | pinchmysalt.com

Dump the crumbly mess out into a large bowl or on a pastry board or countertop. I like to use a big bowl to kind of contain it all in one spot.

Making Sourdough Pie Crust | pinchmysalt.com

Using your hands, quickly work the dough together into one big mass. It should stick together pretty easily.

If for some reason your dough is very crumbly and won’t hold together at all, sprinkle a tablespoon of ice cold water over the top and toss together then try again.

I have never had to add water, but if the hydration of your sourdough starter was off, this is a possibility. Just add cold water in small amounts until you can get the dough together.

Making Sourdough Pie Crust | pinchmysalt.com

Divide the dough into two equal pieces. I use a bench scraper for this.

Making Sourdough Pie Crust | pinchmysalt.com

Take one of the pieces and shape it into a disc on a piece of plastic wrap.

Sourdough Pie Crust Round Ready for the Refrigerator | pinchmysalt.com

Press it out a bit and wrap it in the plastic.

Sourdough Pie Crust Rounds Ready for the Refrigerator | pinchmysalt.com

Repeat. Now put your discs of pie dough in the refrigerator to rest or place them in a freezer bag and put them in the freezer to use within a few months.

Sourdough Pie Crust | pinchmysalt.com

At this point, you can use your sourdough pie crust for one double crust or two single crust pies or quiches, using either 9- or 10-inch pie plates. I think the sourdough flavor pairs best with apple, peach, cherry, and lemon pies.

I used this batch of sourdough pie dough for a lemon cream pie for my husband’s birthday. Here are the instructions for rolling out this dough and blind baking a crust for a cream pie. Here is the recipe for our favorite Lemon Cream Pie, which can be made with this pie crust or your own favorite pie crust recipe.

I’ve added links below to some other pie recipes that I think would be delicious with a sourdough crust. Scroll down past the recipe to find them!

Yields enough dough for one double crust or two single crust pies, 9- or 10-inches

Sourdough Pie Crust
Save Recipe

Ingredients

1 1/2 cups (6.6 oz or 187 g) all purpose flour

1 tablespoon sugar

1 teaspoon salt

1 cup (8 oz or 227 g) butter (two sticks), cut into slices and well chilled

Scant cup (8 oz or 227 g) cold sourdough starter*

Instructions

1. Add flour, sugar, and salt to the bowl of the food processor. Pulse to combine.

2. Scatter slices of butter over the top of the flour mixture; Pulse until the butter breaks up into small chunks. The smaller pieces should be around the size of peas with some larger pieces mixed in.

3. Spread the sourdough starter over the top of the flour/butter mixture. Pulse until the mixture just starts to clump together a bit, but is still crumbly. The dough should feel like it will stay together if you pinch it with your fingers.

4. Dump the dough crumbles out into a large bowl or on a pastry board or countertop. I like to use a big bowl to contain the pieces.

5. Using your hands, quickly work the dough together into one big mass. It should stick together pretty easily. If for some reason your dough is too crumbly and won't hold together at all, sprinkle a tablespoon of ice cold water over the top and toss together then try again.

6. Divide the dough into two equal pieces. Shape the pieces into flattened discs and wrap in plastic wrap.

7. Put the discs of pie dough in the refrigerator to rest for an hour or up to overnight before rolling out for pies. To freeze, place the plastic-wrapped discs in a freezer bag and store in the freezer for up to 3 months. If freezing, defrost dough in the refrigerator overnight. For best results, use pie dough within 24 hours of refrigerating or defrosting the dough.

Notes

Make sure your sourdough starter has been recently fed (within a week) and is well chilled. The sourdough starter needs to be at 100% hydration, which means that it is fed with equal parts flour and water, by weight.

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This post may include Amazon affiliate links. Making purchases through these links won’t affect the amount you pay, but I will earn a small percentage, which helps support this blog and my family. If I write about products I have received for free or am ever paid to write about a product, it will always be disclosed. Thank you.

Related Recipes:

Pie and Quiche Recipes:

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Carrot Tomato Chipotle Soup http://pinchmysalt.com/carrot-tomato-chipotle-soup/ http://pinchmysalt.com/carrot-tomato-chipotle-soup/#comments Thu, 10 Nov 2016 17:00:31 +0000 http://pinchmysalt.com/?p=10542

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Creamy Carrot Tomato Soup with Chipotle | pinchmysalt.com

This rich and creamy Carrot Tomato Chipotle Soup is an easy and delicious upgrade to your tomato soup and grilled cheese sandwich night.

With just a handful of ingredients—some fresh, some from the pantry, you can easily whip this up on a busy weeknight.

I came up with this recipe a few years ago when I was in the middle of dealing with some really tough things. At the time, I scribbled down the ingredients, took a few pictures, and planned to eventually write about it here because it was a really delicious soup.

Although I never managed to write about it back then, I recently found the photos and ingredient list. I decided to make it again last night to see if we still liked it as much now as the first time I made it.

We did!

This soup starts with onion, celery, carrots, canned tomatoes, chicken broth, and coconut milk. I added some chipotle paste for extra flavor and a touch of heat.

Creamy Carrot Tomato Soup with Chipotle ingredients | pinchmysalt.com

The first time I made this, I had a tube of chipotle paste that Phil brought home from work (he works at Sur La Table, so he’s always bringing home specialty ingredients and gadgets to play with). If this is a product you happen to already have, use it.

If not, a much cheaper option is to buy a can of chipotle chiles in adobo and puree it in a blender or mini food processor.

You can keep the chipotle puree in a small glass jar in the refrigerator for a couple months and use it to flavor all kinds of things!

Another option for storing chipotle paste is to freeze it flat in a plastic bag and break off little chunks whenever you need it.

To start the soup, sauté the onions and celery in some olive oil or butter.

Carrots and Onions in Butter | pinchmysalt.com

Next, add the carrots, canned tomatoes, chicken or vegetable broth, and a spoonful of chipotle paste or puree.

Bring it all to a simmer and let cook slowly for about 30 minutes to blend all the flavors and soften the carrots. This is the perfect time to assemble some cheese sandwiches!

Creamy Carrot Tomato Soup with Chipotle | pinchmysalt.com

Next, you can puree the soup in the pot with a stick blender or carefully pour it into the container of a countertop blender or food processor.

If you use a regular blender, make sure not to overfill it and leave the top open a bit to vent the steam or you will end up with a hot soup explosion.

Creamy Carrot Tomato Soup with Chipotle in Blendtec | pinchmysalt.com

Once blended, just pour it back into the pot to keep it warm or serve immediately.

Creamy Carrot Tomato Soup with Chipotle | pinchmysalt.com

And here’s my husband Phil, enjoying the soup three years ago.

Carrot Tomato Chipotle Soup 8

He enjoyed it even more last night because I served it with the parmesan toast shown in the first picture. We’ll have the leftovers today with grilled cheese sandwiches.

I kept the flavors pretty simple in this soup, but feel free to add your favorite fresh herbs or spices. Curry powder would be delicious!

I like to stir in some fresh chopped cilantro and a squeeze of lime at the end, but this carrot tomato soup is also delicious as is.

I’ve shared links to lots of other delicious soup recipes and carrot recipes at the bottom of this post below the recipe. Check them out!

Yields 4 servings (about 6 1/2 cups of soup)

Carrot Tomato Chipotle Soup
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Ingredients

2 tablespoons olive oil, butter, or coconut oil

1 medium onion, chopped

2 medium stalks of celery, chopped

1 pound carrots, peeled and roughly chopped

1 (14.5-oz.)can diced tomatoes (I used fire roasted)

1 can coconut milk

1 tablespoon chipotle puree, or more, to taste (see notes)

2 cups chicken or vegetable broth or stock

Instructions

1. Heat olive oil in a 3-quart pot over medium heat and cook onions and celery for about 5 minutes, stirring occasionally to prevent burning. You want the onions to brown a bit for flavor, but don't worry about softening them.

2. Add the carrots, tomatoes, coconut milk, chipotle puree, and chicken or vegetable broth. Bring to a simmer then reduce heat to keep the liquid bubbling a bit, but not at a full boil. Simmer uncovered for 30 minutes, stirring once or twice.

3. Turn off heat and puree the soup in the pot using a stick blender or let cool a bit then blend carefully in a regular blender. If using a regular blender, make sure not to leave the top open enough to vent the steam and do not overfill the blender. Return the soup to the pot to keep warm.

4. Serve with lime or lemon wedges and fresh chopped cilantro for garnish, if desired.

Notes

I usually add a couple tablespoons of the puree to make the soup a bit spicier. Start with a small amount and add more, tasting as you go. You can also leave the chipotle paste out completely if you're making this for young kids.

To make chipotle puree: Blend a can of chipotle chiles in adobo in a blender or mini food processor until smooth. You can keep the extra chipotle puree in a small glass jar in the refrigerator for a couple months and use it to flavor all kinds of things. Another option for storing the chipotle puree is to freeze it flat in a plastic bag and break off little chunks whenever you need it.

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This post includes Amazon affiliate links. Making purchases through these links won’t affect the amount you pay, but I may earn a small percentage, which helps support this blog and my family. If I write about products I have received for free or am ever paid to write about a product, it will always be disclosed. Thank you.

Related Recipes: 

More Carrot Recipes from my Fall Fest friends:

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Pumpkin Praline Cake with Whipped Cream Frosting http://pinchmysalt.com/praline-pumpkin-cake-with-whipped-cream-frosting/ http://pinchmysalt.com/praline-pumpkin-cake-with-whipped-cream-frosting/#comments Mon, 07 Nov 2016 13:00:16 +0000 http://pinchmysalt.com/?p=6287

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Pumpkin Praline Cake with Whipped Cream Cheese Frosting | pinchmysalt.com

You won’t believe how easy this showstopper of a cake is to make. This Pumpkin Praline Cake with Whipped Cream Cheese Frosting would make a beautiful centerpiece on your Thanksgiving dessert table and your guests will look forward to it year after year.

This post from the archives was originally published in November of 2010, but I’m bringing it forward with updated photos and a printable recipe to remind you of this amazing pumpkin dessert!

I usually have a couple of boxes of yellow cake mix in my pantry in case I need to whip up one of Nana’s Lemon Jello Cakes – it’s always good to be prepared. But last night I was craving pumpkin cake. I had planned on throwing together a quick pumpkin spice cake from scratch until a Google search led me to this Praline-Pumpkin Cake from Betty Crocker.

Pumpkin Praline Cake with Whipped Cream Frosting | pinchmysalt.com

Other than Nana’s Lemon Cake, I don’t use cake mixes much. Making a cake from scratch usually isn’t difficult and I do prefer to know exactly what ingredients I’m adding to the mixing bowl. But this pumpkin praline cake was calling to me and I had all the ingredients on hand.

Cake mixes definitely have their place and this cake was so delicious that I wouldn’t change a thing… except the frosting!

The original recipe instructs you to use canned cream cheese frosting, but I couldn’t do that. In my opinion, canned frosting tastes terrible, especially the cream cheese variety. This amazing pumpkin praline cake deserves better.

Instead, I made a lightly-sweetened whipped cream frosting using both cream cheese and whipping cream. It’s perfect on this cake – not too heavy, not too sweet. And it’s almost as easy as opening a tup of frosting from the store.

Make sure the pumpkin praline cake layers have cooled completely before using the whipped cream frosting or it will melt and your layers will start sliding (trust me, it happened). You might even want to put them in the refrigerator for 30 minutes after they have cooled, before frosting the cake.

After frosting, serve immediately or refrigerate the cake. This is one cake that actually tastes really great cold.  In fact, I think I liked it even better after it sat in the refrigerator overnight, so it’s definitely one you could and maybe should make ahead.

Although I always look forward to pies at Thanksgiving, this is one dessert that might give Thanksgiving pies a run for their money. It’s easy to make, looks impressive, and tastes amazing!

The following recipe was adapted from Betty Crocker’s Praline-Pumpkin Cake.

Yields 16 servings

Pumpkin Praline Cake with Whipped Cream Cheese Frosting
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Ingredients

Cake:

1/2 cup butter

1/4 cup whipping cream

1 cup packed brown sugar

3/4 cup coarsely chopped pecans

1 box yellow cake mix

1 cup canned pumpkin

1/2 cup water

1/3 cup vegetable oil

4 eggs

1 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice

Frosting:

4 ounces softened cream cheese

1/2 teaspoon vanilla

1/2 - 1 cup powdered sugar (or more to taste)

1 cup heavy whipping cream

handful of pecan halves for decoration

Instructions

Cake:

1. Preheat oven to 325°F. In a small heavy saucepan, stir together butter, whipping cream and brown sugar. Cook over low heat, stirring occasionally, just until butter is melted. Divide topping between two ungreased 8- or 9-inch round cake pans then sprinkle evenly with the chopped pecans.

2. In a large bowl, beat cake mix, pumpkin, water, oil, eggs and pumpkin pie spice with electric mixer on low speed until moistened, then on medium speed for 2 more minutes, scraping bowl occasionally. Carefully spoon batter over pecan mixture in each pan, dividing as evenly as possible.

3. Bake cakes for 41 to 47 minutes or until cake springs back when touched lightly in center. Cool 5 minutes then turn cakes out onto a cooling rack. Cool completely before frosting (at least an hour).

Make Frosting:

Using an electric mixer (I used the whisk attachment on my stand mixer), beat the cream cheese, vanilla, and sugar until light and creamy. Beat in 1/4 cup whipping cream until smooth (scrape and stir with spatula as necessary). Add the rest of the cream and beat until it has the consistency of whipped cream (don't overmix).

Assemble Cake:

Place one cake layer on decorative plate or cake stand, praline-side up. Spread half of the frosting on top of cake. Top with the other cake layer, praline-side up. Spread the rest of the frosting over the top. Decorate with pecan halves.

Serve immediately or store in the refrigerator until ready to serve. If cake is made ahead, take cake out of the refrigerator about an hour before serving. It does not need to come completely to room temperature before serving as it does taste good cold. Leftovers should be stored loosely covered in the refrigerator.

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More Pumpkin Recipes:

Pumpkin Praline Cake with Whipped Cream Cheese Frosting | pinchmysalt.com
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Sourdough Banana Bread http://pinchmysalt.com/sourdough-banana-bread/ http://pinchmysalt.com/sourdough-banana-bread/#comments Sun, 06 Nov 2016 12:00:27 +0000 http://pinchmysalt.com/?p=10486

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Although it might sound fancier or more complicated than a traditional banana bread, this sourdough banana bread recipe is even easier to put together than regular banana bread. And it’s so delicious your friends and neighbors will be begging to know your secret ingredient.

The reason this sourdough banana bread is so easy to make is that I use my food processor to combine all the ingredients. You can make this with a mixer if you don’t have a food processor, but my Cuisinart whips it up in no time!

Because it’s blended together in the food processor, you don’t even have to mash the bananas first! In fact, I even let the Cuisinart chop the walnuts for me as it’s mixing. Easy peasy.

Sourdough Banana Bread | pinchmysalt.com

Like the sourdough biscuit and pancake recipes I have posted recently, this banana bread recipe uses a cup of sourdough starter straight from the refrigerator so it’s a perfect way to use up the sourdough discard when feeding your starter.

Sourdough banana bread is put together like a regular quick bread but it uses a cup of sourdough starter to replace part of the flour and liquid from a traditional banana bread recipe. The sourdough starter adds extra flavor, but doesn’t actually make the banana bread taste like sourdough bread.

Your sourdough banana bread will just have that little something special that will make people wonder what your secret is.

Sourdough Banana Bread | pinchmysalt.com

If you’d like to keep your own sourdough starter so you can make sourdough bread, biscuits, pancakes, chocolate cake, pumpkin cake, banana bread, and more, you should make your own.

I’ve recently updated my sourdough starter post to include printable instructions. And I have shared step-by-step, day-by-day photos of the entire process in case you want to check back in to compare your results with mine along the way. It takes about a week to create a sourdough starter from scratch, but it’s easy to do and only takes a couple minutes of work each day.

If you’d prefer to purchase a sourdough starter instead, King Arthur Flour sells one and it works great. In fact, my very first sourdough starter was one I purchased from them over ten years ago!

If you already have a sourdough starter ready to go, lucky you! Let’s make some banana bread! Make sure to check out the links below the printable recipe because I’m sharing some great sourdough ideas this week.

Sourdough Banana Bread | pinchmysalt.com

Sourdough Banana Bread
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Ingredients

1 1/2 cups all purpose flour

1 cup sugar*

1 teaspoon baking soda

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 cup sourdough starter (cold is fine)

1/2 cup softened butter

1 cup mashed ripe banana (about 2 1/2 medium bananas)

1 egg

1 teaspoon vanilla

1 cup walnut halves (or 3/4 cup chopped walnuts)

Instructions

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease a 8-by-4-inch loaf pan with butter or baking spray. (use a 9-by-5-inch loaf pan if that’s all you have. The loaf will be a bit shorter than pictured and might bake slightly faster.)

Food Processor Instructions:

1. Fit your food processor with the standard mixing blade. Add flour, sugar, baking soda, and salt to the bowl and pulse to combine.

2. Pour sourdough starter over the top of the flour (if it’s thick, just spread it out as evenly as possible over the flour), cut softened butter into about 5 chunks and distribute over the top of the starter and flour. Break bananas into chunks and distribute them over the other ingredients (or just spread the mashed banana over the top). Add the egg and vanilla. Cover and pulse all the ingredients together until a thick, smooth batter is formed.

3. Add the walnut halves and pulse a few more times until they are chopped and evenly distributed (if your walnuts are already chopped, just pulse to quickly combine.

4. Carefully remove the blade and scrape any batter off the blade back into the bowl. Scrape the batter into the greased loaf pan then smooth the top.

5. Bake at 350 degrees for 60 to 70 minutes or until well browned and a toothpick inserted in the center of the loaf comes out clean.

Mixer instructions:

1. In a medium bowl, whisk together flour baking soda and salt; set aside.

2. In a separate large mixing bowl or bowl of a stand mixer, cream together butter and sugar until light.

3. Beat in egg, vanilla, sourdough starter, and mashed banana. Gradually beat in flour mixture until well combined, scraping the bowl occasionally as you go. Stir in chopped walnuts.

4. Scrape batter into greased loaf pan and smooth the top.

5. Bake at 350 degrees for 60-70 minutes, or until well browned and a toothpick inserted in the center of the loaf comes out clean.

Notes

Sugar can be reduced to 3/4 cup if you like a slightly less sweet banana bread. Whole wheat flour can be used in place of all purpose flour (white whole wheat flour makes a great banana bread). If you use kosher salt instead of table salt, increase to 1 teaspoon.

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This post includes Amazon affiliate links. Making purchases through these links won’t affect the amount you pay, but I will earn a small percentage, which helps support this blog and my family. Thank you.

More Sourdough Recipes:

Sourdough Recipes Around the Web:

Sourdough Banana Bread Recipe | pinchmysalt.com
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Appetizer Idea: Steamed Brussels Sprouts with Dilly Dip http://pinchmysalt.com/appetizer-idea-steamed-brussels-sprouts-with-dilly-dip/ http://pinchmysalt.com/appetizer-idea-steamed-brussels-sprouts-with-dilly-dip/#comments Thu, 03 Nov 2016 15:55:11 +0000 http://pinchmysalt.com/?p=10345

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Steamed Brussels Sprouts with Dill Dip | pinchmysalt.com

One of my favorite Thanksgiving appetizers is a simple plate filled with fresh veggies and a bowl of creamy dill dip. But do you know what tastes even better with dill dip than carrot and celery sticks? Steamed and chilled brussels sprouts! 

It might seem a bit unusual to add steamed Brussels sprouts to a crudité platter, but they are really delicious served with a fresh dill dip or ranch dip. In my family, the steamed Brussels sprouts are one of the first things to disappear from the appetizer table (along with the deviled eggs, of course).

Steamed Brussels Sprouts with Dill Dip | pinchmysalt.com

Dilly dip can be made with dried dill, fresh dill or a combination of the two. While the recipes floating around my family rely on dried dill and sometimes a packet of Hidden Valley Ranch, I like to add some fresh dill when it’s available. Chopped Italian parsley is another great addition that adds a nice fresh flavor to the dip.

If you don’t have access to fresh herbs or you just want to make the dip with what you already have in the pantry, it tastes great even without the fresh dill and parsley. Experiment and make it your own. Just don’t forget the steamed and chilled Brussels Sprouts!

I’ve included instructions in the recipe below for preparing the Brussels sprouts in a way that keeps them bright green and vibrant after cooking, which is important if you’re going to serve them to guests. Overcooked, gray-green Brussels sprouts really don’t look very appetizing!

So tell me, does your family have a favorite Thanksgiving appetizer? Have you ever tried cold, cooked Brussels sprouts with a creamy dip?

Steamed Brussels Sprouts with Dill Dip | pinchmysalt.com

Yields about 2 cups of dip

Steamed Brussels Sprouts with Dilly Dip
Save Recipe

Ingredients

1 cup sour cream

1 cup mayonnaise

2 teaspoons dried dill weed

1 1/2 teaspoon Spike, Beau Monde, or other seasoned salt*

1/2 teaspoon onion powder

1 tablespoon fresh chopped dill

1 tablespoon fresh chopped parsley

2 pounds fresh Brussels sprouts

Instructions

Make the dip:

Whisk together sour cream, mayonnaise, and all herbs and spices until well blended. Taste, and adjust seasonings if desired. Cover and store in refrigerator for at least one hour before serving.

Prepare the Brussels sprouts:

Trim off the stem ends of the Brussels sprouts and remove any blemished outer leaves. Cut each Brussels sprout in half from top to bottom. The tiny ones can be left whole.

Fit a pot with a steamer insert then add water to just below the bottom of insert. Cover, and bring water to a boil. Add Brussels sprouts to steamer insert then cover and steam until bright green and just tender, about 7 to 8 minutes. Immediately transfer to a bowl of ice water, which will stop the cooking and keep the color vibrant. Drain well then pat dry with paper towels. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator until ready to serve.

Notes

*I used Spike Gourmet Natural Seasoning this time and it worked great, but in the past I have used Spice Islands Beau Monde Seasoning. You can also use just any seasoned salt you happen to have on hand.

If you would like to lighten up the dip, you can use light (not fat free) mayonnaise and sour cream. Another option is to use lowfat plain Greek-style yogurt in place of the sour cream.

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Other Thanksgiving Appetizer Ideas:

Other Brussels Sprouts Recipes from my Fall Fest Friends:

Healthy Eats: 5 Healthier Ways to Spruce Up Brussels Sprouts
Creative Culinary: Bowtie Pasta with Bacon and Brussels Sprouts
The Fed Up Foodie: Beef and Brussels Sprouts Stew
Hey Grill Hey: Brown Sugar Bacon Brussels Sprout Bites
A Mind “Full” Mom: Brussels Sprouts Caesar Salad
Taste with the Eyes: Roasted Brussels Sprouts, Italian Sausage, Balsamic Syrup
The Mediterranean Dish: Fall Rotini Pasta Salad with Brussels Sprouts and Butternut Squash
The Mom 100: Roasted Cauliflower, Brussels Sprouts and Leeks with Spicy Drizzle
Devour: Every Day We’re Brusselin’: 4 Craveable Brussels Sprout Salads
Swing Eats: Braised Brussels Sprouts with Bacon, Shallots and Sherry Over Loose Polenta
In Jennie’s Kitchen: Pan Seared Cauliflower, Brussels Sprouts, Pear & Walnut Salad
FN Dish: 7 Recipes That Will Make Literally Anyone a Brussels Sprout Believer

Steamed Brussels Sprouts with Dill Dip | pinchmysalt.com
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Whole Wheat Persimmon Bread with Walnuts and Brandy http://pinchmysalt.com/whole-wheat-persimmon-bread/ http://pinchmysalt.com/whole-wheat-persimmon-bread/#comments Tue, 01 Nov 2016 15:30:14 +0000 http://pinchmysalt.com/?p=6333

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Whole Wheat Persimmon Bread Recipe | pinchmysalt.com

If you’ve never tried persimmon bread, you’re in for a treat! Rich with butter and filled with dried fruit, nuts, spices, and brandy, this persimmon quick bread is perfect for the holidays! I’ve added a healthy twist by using whole wheat pastry flour to add some extra flavor and nutrition, but you’d never guess that this is a healthy persimmon bread recipe. 

This post from the archives was originally published in November 2010. I’m sharing it again today with updated photos and a printable recipe. Enjoy!

Like most places around the country, autumn in California’s San Joaquin Valley is a beautiful time of year.  While we might not have as many vibrant colored leaves as other places, we do have fruit trees.  Pomegranates, persimmons, lemons – these are our fall colors.  Take a drive through the country or just about any older neighborhood and you’re bound to run across some of these beautiful trees with their red, orange, and yellow fruit.

Persimmon trees are my fall favorite.  The trees drop their leaves as the fruit ripens, leaving nothing but the spectacular glowing orange orbs— it’s quite a beautiful sight.

Hachiya Persimmons | pinchmysalt.com

More than just autumn decorations, persimmons are wonderful to bake with.  The persimmons I’m talking about today are the larger, acorn-shaped Hachiya variety.

Hachiya persimmons can be very astringent and not suitable for eating raw until they are very, very ripe.  But by the time they are ripe enough to eat, the flesh is gooey and gelatinous.  Because of this, I find that Hachiya persimmon pulp is better for baking than for eating raw (although some people do like to eat it with a spoon).

The smaller, squat variety of persimmon that has been showing up at more and more grocery stores lately is the Fuyu.  These can be eaten raw while they are still firm, and their mild sweet flavor makes them easy to love.

Whole Wheat Persimmon Bread Recipe | pinchmysalt.com

I like to bake cookies when I get my hands on some persimmons, but this year I decided to try something a little different.  I saw that David Lebovitz had written about a persimmon bread from James Beard’s book Beard on Bread. I happen to have my mom’s old battered copy of that book (it’s a year older than I am, actually), so I dug it out and looked at the recipe.

James Beard’s Persimmon Bread is a butter-rich quick bread filled with fruit, nuts, and booze.  It sounded great to me and seemed like a good way to use up some of the brandy that I bought for the Caramel Apple Pear Cake.

Whole Wheat Persimmon Bread Recipe | pinchmysalt.com

The original recipe makes enough batter for two large loaves, but since I was afraid I would devour an entire large loaf myself, I decided to cut the recipe in half and bake it in three mini loaf pans. That way I could give two away, and eat one small loaf myself.

I had a big bag of mixed dried fruit that I bought for the Panettone I was making for The Bread Baker’s Apprentice Challenge, so I decided to use that instead of just plain raisins.  I also chose to use whole wheat pastry flour in place of all-purpose—I thought it would add a bit of extra flavor and nutrition.  The original recipe calls for mace as the main spice, but I used a combination of ground cinnamon and nutmeg.

A new thing I learned from Beard on Bread is that you can use the persimmon skin along with the pulp.  I have always peeled the fruit before making the puree, but this time I used the skin, too.  It was much easier and I liked the tiny flecks of orange that the skin added to the bread.

You must use very ripe Hachiya persimmons for the puree.  To ripen persimmons, just leave them sitting out at room temperature until they are very soft and feel like they are turning to liquid inside the skin.  As David Lebovitz says, a completely ripe Hachiya persimmon should feel like a water balloon about to burst.  To make the puree, just blend the persimmon pulp (and skin, if you like) until smooth.

I have shared links to other persimmon recipes at the bottom of this post—check them out if you’d like more ideas for cooking with both hachiya and fuyu persimmons.

Yields one large loaf or three mini loaves

Whole Wheat Persimmon Bread
Save Recipe

Ingredients

1 cup chopped dried mixed fruit or raisins

1/3 cup brandy

1 3/4 cup whole wheat pastry flour

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon baking soda

1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg (use freshly ground nutmeg, if possible)

1 1/4 cups sugar

1/2 cup melted butter

2 eggs, lightly beaten

1 cup persimmon puree (from approximately 2 very ripe Hachiya persimmons)

1 cup chopped walnuts or pecans

Instructions

1. Preaheat oven to 350 degrees. Butter one 9x5-inch loaf pan or three mini loaf pans.

2. In a small bowl, stir together mixed fruit and brandy; set aside.

3. In a large mixing bowl, whisk together flour, salt, baking soda, cinnamon, nutmeg, and sugar.

4. Make a well in the center of the flour mixture and pour in melted butter, eggs, persimmon puree, brandy-fruit mixture, and chopped nuts. Stir with a wooden spoon until well combined.

5. Pour batter into a greased 9x5-inch loaf pan or divide between three mini loaf pans. Bake in a preheated 350 degree oven for one hour (40-45 minutes for mini loaves) or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean.

6. Cool on a wire rack. Store well-wrapped bread at room temperature for up to a week or freeze for longer storage.

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Kitchen equipment used in this recipe:
(Amazon affiliate links)

Related Recipes:

Hachiya Persimmon Recipes around the Web:

Fuyu Persimmon Recipes around the Web:

Whole Wheat Persimmon Bread Recipe | pinchmysalt.com
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Sourdough Sunday: Perfect Buttermilk Sourdough Pancakes http://pinchmysalt.com/perfect-fluffy-sourdough-pancakes-recipe/ http://pinchmysalt.com/perfect-fluffy-sourdough-pancakes-recipe/#comments Sun, 30 Oct 2016 18:52:24 +0000 http://pinchmysalt.com/?p=10325

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Easy overnight buttermilk sourdough pancakes | pinchmysalt.com

These perfect buttermilk sourdough pancakes are mixed up the night before and ready to be cooked in the morning for a lazy weekend breakfast. They are very easy to make once you have your sourdough starter going and I believe they are the most delicious pancakes you’ll ever taste.

Easy overnight buttermilk sourdough pancakes | pinchmysalt.com

Even if you aren’t interested in baking sourdough bread from scratch, these pancakes and the sourdough biscuits that I shared last week are more than enough reason to keep a sourdough starter in the refrigerator.

Whether you get some from a friend, buy it online, or make your own (it’s really not that hard!), maintaining a sourdough starter is easy. And once you have a jar of starter bubbling away on the counter or tucked away in the refrigerator, you can use it to start making these delicious pancakes that everyone will love. In my experience, even people who don’t normally care much about pancakes will rave about these!

Mixing overnight sourdough pancakes batter | pinchmysalt.com

Making the batter is simple. The night before, stir together flour, buttermilk, and sourdough starter. Cover the bowl and let it sit out at cool room temperature overnight. By the way, if you don’t have buttermilk, regular milk works just fine in this recipe.

Mixing overnight sourdough pancakes batter | pinchmysalt.com

The next morning, the batter will be nice and bubbly and ready for the rest of the ingredients.

Mixing overnight sourdough pancakes batter | pinchmysalt.com

Stir in an egg that has been beaten with salt and baking soda. I mix the soda and salt into the egg just to help everything get distributed into the thick batter a little easier.

Mixing overnight sourdough pancakes batter | pinchmysalt.com

Stir it all together until the egg is completely mixed in.

Mixing overnight sourdough pancakes batter | pinchmysalt.com

Next, stir in the melted butter. I add the butter separately so that the melted butter doesn’t doesn’t harden from being mixed with the cold egg.

Mixing overnight sourdough pancakes batter | pinchmysalt.com

That’s it! Your pancake batter is ready to go.

How to grease a cast iron griddle | pinchmysalt.com

I cook my pancakes on a cast iron griddle that came with my stove. Because it’s cast iron and takes a while to heat, I turn it on before the final mixing of the batter. Then when I’m ready to cook, I brush it lightly with either butter or oil using a silicone pastry brush. This time I used coconut oil.

Sourdough pancakes on the griddle | pinchmysalt.com

Sometimes I make big pancakes, sometimes I make small ones. It just depends on my mood and who I’m feeding. These were for my husband, so they are on the large side.

This is a pretty thick batter so the pancakes will cook up thick and fluffy. Because of that, you want to make sure your griddle isn’t too hot or the pancakes will burn before they are cooked through. You’ll know it’s time to flip them when edges of the pancakes are starting to look dry.

Easy overnight buttermilk sourdough pancakes | pinchmysalt.com

Easy overnight buttermilk sourdough pancakes | pinchmysalt.com

It may take a little trial and error to get the griddle to the perfect temperature, but once you get the hang of it, you’ll be rewarded with perfect, golden, fluffy sourdough pancakes.

Easy overnight buttermilk sourdough pancakes | pinchmysalt.com

Don’t forget the butter and maple syrup!

Easy overnight buttermilk sourdough pancakes | pinchmysalt.com

This pancake recipe is adapted from the recipe that came with the original sourdough starter I purchased from King Arthur Flour about 10 years ago.

Yields 10–12 4-inch pancakes, about 3 servings.

Perfect Sourdough Pancakes
Save Recipe

Ingredients

1/2 cup whole wheat flour

1/2 cup all purpose flour

1/2 cup sourdough starter

1 cup buttermilk

1 tablespoon sugar

1 egg

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon baking soda

2 tablespoons butter, melted and cooled

Instructions

The night before you want to make pancakes:

Combine the flours and sugar in a mixing bowl. Add buttermilk and sourdough starter and stir to combine. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap. Let sit out at cool room temperature overnight (up to 12 hours is fine).

The following morning:

Melt butter and set aside to cool a bit. In a separate bowl, whisk together egg, baking soda, and salt. Stir egg mixture into the pancake batter until well combined then stir in melted butter.

Drop by spoonful (as large or small as you want) onto a moderately hot, lightly greased skillet or griddle. Cook pancakes until bubbly and starting to dry out on the edges then flip and and continue cooking until browned to your liking on the other side.

Notes

This recipe feeds about 3 people. Recipe can easily be doubled or tripled for a larger family.

You can use all purpose flour in place of whole wheat if desired, but the whole flour tastes great in this recipe.

Regular milk can be used in place of buttermilk if that's all you have. I do this quite often and the pancakes still have a great flavor because of the sourdough starter.

If the batter seems way too thick, you can thin it with a bit more buttermilk or milk. Just be careful not to add too much or your pancakes will turn out very thin.

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